Look at Eva, 4 months old and standing

Both the literature and practice indicate that children can stand without support starting at around 9 months old. Yet, with practice, children can stand without support even before they are 4 months old. This is much earlier than has been reported in the literature.

A new way to slow cancer cell growth

Researchers have identified a new way to potentially slow the fast-growing cells that characterize all types of cancer. By removing a specific protein from cells, they were able to slow the cell cycle, which is out of control in cancer. The findings were made in kidney and cervical cancer cells and are a long way from being applied in people, but could be the basis of a treatment option in the future.

Marmoset monkeys learn to call the same way human infants learn to babble

Human social groups have a strange tendency to share responsibility for taking care of infants; parents, older siblings, and other adult relatives all help to nurture babies. The only other primates that take care of infants this way are marmosets, a group of small, highly social monkeys from South America. In another striking parallel to humans, infant marmosets also benefit from frequent feedback while learning their vocal calls.

Brain images reveal roots of kids’ increasing cognitive control

As children age into adolescence and on into young adulthood, they show dramatic improvements in their ability to control impulses, stay organized, and make decisions. Those ‘executive functions’ of the brain are key factors in determining outcomes, including educational success, drug use, and psychiatric illness. Now, researchers have mapped the changes in the network organization of the brain that underlie those improvements in executive function.

In fruit fly and human genetics, timing is everything

Using fruit flies, researchers have discovered a cascade of molecular signals that program gene activity to drive the fly from one stage of maturation to the next, like a baby turning into an adult. Part of this programming involves alterations to the way DNA is packaged. Those alterations open certain regions of DNA to allow gene activity and close off other regions to prevent gene activity. These changes to DNA accessibility occur in sequence.

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